Can a Gift be repossessed? HELP?

A friend met this Guy online , after dating for 1 month the Guy refurnished her appartment (he didnt move in). He took all the my friends old couches n bed, wadrobe etc and bought fresh furniture for her.Now the relationship is souring and the new guy is threating to take spinal column everything , that will leave her with no furniture at adjectives. What does the law say nearly ,can a gift be repossessed?
Answers:
in the uk a gift is a bequest and belongs to the receiver unless there is some paperwork/contract/agreement that say otherwise. If the giver has not finished paying for the grant then he just have to carry on paying - the contract there is between the benefactor and the supplier - the recipient would not be liable for payment.

This also includes loans between relations in a personal relationship. So if you loan your girlfriend/boyfriend money get it within writing that it is a loan. The court's default position will be that it was a payment.
If this was her apartment --before she met him -- and there be no agreement or understanding, stated or implied, that he was buying this stuff contained by order for him to move in beside her , they are gifts and they belong to her.

The suspicion is, however, that he is going to argue that he bought them with her full knowledge of his intention to move contained by with her. In which case , any they reach an agreement themselves or employ lawyer.
If it was a gift next ownership is transferred to the Receiver. The give cannot legally hold it away.
Also to do so would mean entering the other persons property. This is trespass and/or breaking and entering. He would stipulation to sue in court for the return of the items and would probably lose.
Depends on the arrangement. If he had said to her, "Let me furnish the place because I want to move in some daytime, and I like to have (my) nice things beside me", then yes, he could take them support. It's just like if he brought his diary collection and stored there so that he could use them while he visited, and, possibly, when he moved in eventually.

But if he said, "Here, chuck out all the behind the times stuff and let me give you investigational ones", then she may have a overnight case for keeping them. Then the court will have to establish which was the more probable arrangement.
yes
It depends on whether the demon wants to possess it again.
IDK about the UK, but within the US, unless there is some written or verbal agreement something like the belongings or contract that includes the belongings as payment - then NO. Gifts cannot be repossessed, unless he is doing rent-2-own furniture, surrounded by which case they can be. I have even see people go to court over gifts of engagement rings & other valuables, (that they required back after the relationship was over), but seeing as how it be a pure & simple gift, no one can nick it from the person who it was given to. They did not produce an agreement that the receiver would pay for it, next or later, they made no agreement that the receiver trade for it, or return it if things changed.

Your friend should be fine, those are her things, not his. He cant seize them back. Although, it is possible - IF he has receipts - that he could try to claim she stole them or purloin her to small-claims court to try to get them back. Of course, the cops wont simply believe that she stole them without other PROOF that she did (which she didnt). He could have given her a untried house & $50K car, but as soon as they are signed over to her or in her possession - they are HERS. Source(s): Possession is 9/10 of the statute. If the person who gave her the furniture bought it within his name, and is still paying it off, later legally the furniture belongs to him. Because, if he reneges on the payments, the furniture can be repossessed by the credit company.

But, if he bought it outright and gave it to your friend as a contribution, and both of them agreed it was a gift, next it's hers.

Have to say your friend was a bit easy to fleece, and I really suggest she consult a solicitor to see what her position is.


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