Unsupervised underneath fives playing on street alone...legalized position(UK)?

In our cul de sac where cars can suddenly swerve around a corner or out of driveways(have seen several practical misses) there are around five to eight or more small children between the age of four and six.playing together They are sent out to play after school, recurrently they are charging around (noisily)on the street on their small bicycles and a parent is nowhere to be seen (the parents appear at dusk, currently at 7-7.30pm to find their children...dont know where they are or who they are with). A battery-operated operated big ride in vehicle has recently be seen used by the children on the street itself. Cars have to stop as they move onto the kerb to contribute way to the car. Its really chancy and the parents are not aproachable (Ive tried). What is the legal position. Would the police be interested? I fear that these children enjoy no guidance nor are they supervised and as they are so young they can be quite raging and noisy and not least adjectives.
Answers:
You can phone the police, but as they will probably refer the matter to Social Services, perhaps you could do that, via your local Council. These children are clearly person neglected and are at risk.
Sounds similar to they are feral, like packs of dogs contained by New Delhi. Members of the Belgian government and their Catholic clergy might be interested. Don't give them the street entitle whatever you do. You can't do much if the parents don't care. They might decimate you instead.
Report the chavvy little blighters to your council. Don't let it rest until adjectives those kids are under proper control, you shouldn't have to suffer other people's kids adjectives the time.
are you really concerned about the welfare of these kids or are they really getting on your wick
i and my friends played out on the streets and within my view its all slice and parcel of growing up
if you truly believe these kids are in danger after report it Source(s): my head
In the UK the law does not set a minimum age at which children can be left alone. In view you could allow your two year old out to play on the street.

However, it is an offence to check out of a child alone when doing so puts him or her *at risk* so allowing the two year old to play in the middle of the road could constitute 'neglect'.

There are frequent important things to consider before a child is gone alone. These include:

* the age of the child
* the child's level of maturity and caring
* the place where the child will be left
* how long, and how habitually, the child will be left alone
* whether or not there are any other children near the child.

For example, most parents would think it's OK to leave a 15-year-old alone for the evening. But to move out them for a week would be unacceptable.

Many young children play outdoors beside other children without supervision, most people would agree that this is an essential part of growing up. To leave children outdoors for a considerable length of time though, or to allow them to rove off without knowing where on earth they are going would be unacceptable.

Yor best bet is to contact your Local Authority and see what they say.
Go onto the 'fixmystreet.com' site and report the matter to your local council.
http://www.fixmystreet.com/reports
Just scroll down the list until you see your local council, clic surrounded by the link and follow the instructions from there. You freshly type in your postcode, remain anonymous if you wish, and type the category and the personality of your complaint. The council cannot ignore it, and they have to do 'something'. It might not stop your problem, but at lowest possible there is a record of a complaint. Perhaps if you capture together with several of your other neighbours, they will also report it and add strength to your defence.

I would definitely remain anonymous for your own safety though if I be you. If it's a bad area, later the parents may take revenge on you for reporting them if they know it's you. Source(s): Personal experience.


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