To what length can i shield my property?

Basically I live in the U.K. Earlier someone tried to climb through a broken fencing panel which cuts off my stern garden and an alleyway to to others gardens, luckily my mum was on the phone up the end and caught the bloke red hand and said oi what are you playing at etc. This made him dissapear quick sharp. I ran out the front door to try and come first him off but he was too spur-of-the-moment and didnt catch him.

Basically what I want to know, is if this **** steps foot on my property once again, I think they are looking to score my dog as it is quite valuable, what is trial and what isnt? Can I take the ****** out with a bat. As the oldest mannish in the house im the one who is responsible for looking after people.

Ridiculous I am even have to ask this question as imo if someone steps on your property uninvited then they should be f¨ēte game, but seeing as this country is useless I need to know what I can do and what I cant.

Thanks surrounded by advance.
Answers:
I'm afraid that I would take the decree into my own hands
By the time any policeman , politician or lawyer reach me it would be too late
You can use "reasonable" force to protect yourself or property.
That scheme that if someone breaks in and is unarmed and you take a baseball bat to them and conquer the heck out of them then YOU will end up man charged.
If you chase the person down the street and beat the heck out of them later YOU will be charged.

If the person is armed (knife or whatever) and you think your duration is in immediate risk then you can respond with poisonous (but "reasonable) force.
As a private citizen you have the following right/powers that could be valid here:

You have the right to use reasonable force to remove a trespasser from your manor. However, you have to give them an opportunity to give up your job freely first. IE you have to tell them to check out of, and if they do not take steps to do so, such as moving towards the gate, you can use pretty good force to remove them. You do also have to make it possible for them to will, eg by unlocking the gate. Once they have gone (with or without your intervention) you can take no further movement or retribution.

You have the right to use reasonable force to protect yourself, others, or property. The threat has to be real and actual - you cannot merely suspect that someone might do something. Once the threat have been removed (eg because they run away) you cannot chase them or continue to attack them.

You hold a power of arrest (citizens arrest) if a crime has taken place and you have a defensible suspicion that the person you are arresting is the culprit. This is much narrower than the power of arrest of a police officer, who can arrest to prevent crime or if he suspects a crime has taken place. You are entitled to use restrained force to make the arrest, and you must call the police to come and steal over. So you cannot drag the arrested person away, or search them, or "punish" them, or anything else.

In adjectives these cases "reasonable force" means no more than is prerequisite in the circumstances, which includes the seriousness of the crime or damage or threat within question. Eg to remove a trespasser who is not otherwise threatening damage "reasonable" might be grab their arm and dragging them out of the gate but no more. But if someone is waving a axe in your face "reasonable" might be hitting them beside garden spade, possibly even if serious injury was caused. But within all cases force will probably not be reasonable if you own pre-armed yourself, or a lying in wait, or verbs to use it after the threat has ended.
OK, so, vitally, you are allowed to defend yourself and your property, as long as you don't use "excessive force". This means if someone is on your property, and you speak about them to leave, you can hit them etc. If they are unarmed however, and you pick up a weapon, you will get surrounded by trouble. Try security lights and an alarm to keep those out of your yard.
Vigilante execution for trespass is not, as yet, part of the decree.

You can use reasonable force to defend yourself and others, and your property. What is acceptable is determined by the circumstances in which you find yourself.

This is not the Wild West. If the inability to kill society who climb over your fence is too restrictive for you, you may want to emigrate to Somalia. Source(s): I'm a lawyer


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