What are Battery Charges surrounded by Uk directive?.?

I was assaulted by a person which have resulted in fracture in my thumb. The police enjoy charged the person with mobile charges along with other charges. I 'd like to know which charges are appropriate within this case Battery, or GBH(Grevious Body Harm)?
Answers:
Battery is certainly applicable (physical assault resulting surrounded by a non-trivial injury).
Grievous Bodily Harm would require a much more serious injury, (life threatening, causing disability or disfigurement).
In between those would be Actual Bodily Harm, but that too would normally require a more serious injury than you enjoy sustained.
Battery is when a human being makes contact with you - you can assault someone short touching them.
If I point a knife at you and you feel surrounded by fear of me - this is assault. Even though we have not made contact. If I hit you from astern and you did not see me or know I was going to do it - this is a Battery - NOT assault - because you were not within fear of me because you did not know or feel threatened by my coming at you from losing.
In the case where your thumb be broken - this is GBH because you were damaged any by breaking the to skin surface or internal body damage with no external nreach of the skin.
Assault and freestyle is when you are in fear of me and later i make contact with you - such as, I enunciate to you I am going to hit you (this makes you fear me (assault) afterwards i actually hit you (Battery) assault and battery)
Battery is unlawful physical contract - anything from a tap on the arm to a core attack with a weapon. In everyday language most culture (including lawyers) call this an assault, but assault is actually making someone suggest they are about to be subject to a battery.

The subsequent level up is assault (see - really this should be battery) causing actual bodily wound - usually abbreviated to ABH. This is any non-permanent physical harm, such as minor scratches, bruises, etc.

The top rank is assault causing grievous bodily harm - usually call GBH. This is really serious harm - broken bones, deep wounds, unchanging injuries, etc.

A fractured thumb is propably not serious enough to be GBH, but is almost certainly ABH. However, it is much easier to prove the overnight case for assault / battery, because all the prosecution requirements to do is to prove that contact was made. To prove ABH requires the prosecution to show that the attack did lead to your injury, which within practice might be tough. As the sentence for a "minor" ABH conviction overlaps with the sentence for a "serious" battery conviction its much easier, cheaper, and quicker to stir for the more certain battery prosecution.
Battery is also known as assault by beating or adjectives assault. Perhaps the police were not aware of the fracture and a charge of ABH (assault occasioning actual bodily harm) would be more appropriate.


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